video art by Lily & Honglei, new media art China, new media artist

Butterfly Lovers, still image of video by Lily & Honglei.
Oil on paper. 2009

Video painting is a form of video art presented via projectors, LCD or other flat panel display and wall-mounted in the same manner as traditional paintings. [1]

Ambient video will emerge as a supremely pictorial form – relying on visual impact and the subtle manipulation of image, layer, flow, and transition. It sits in the visual background of our lives – always changing, but never too quickly. It does not conquer, it seduces. It rewards attention, but never commands it. Rather, its aim is to support whatever level of attention the viewer cares to bestow in the moment: a passing glance, a more intentional look, or a longer and deeper immersion within the dynamically changing experience of an ambient video world.” – Jim Bizzocchi (http://www.dadaprocessing.com), an artist and Assistant Professor at Simon Fraser University’s School of Interactive Arts and Technology.

moon1

Title: Flow. Chinese ink painting on rice paper. Still image of video ‘Moon,’ by Lily & Honglei. 2012-13

“my philosophy is that collectors should have a screen devoted to art in their home. It’s not about watching television—it’s about screen-based experiences that are art-related. And it comes down to cost and accessibility, right? You can buy a 46-inch screen today for $400, or you can buy a Mac Mini or a comparable PC that can run Quicktime movies, et cetera, for $500. A devoted system works great if you don’t have an enormous home but have several pieces of video art.

“Of course, this is dependent on the artist being okay with that—they may insist on their art being screened on a specific, single-purpose unit. But more often than not when you buy unframed video, as long as you’re playing it to the right specifications, it’s fine. So you, as a collector, can amass a large amount of work in a single location and experience many, many pieces as you wish. You can really have an incredible range of work within that devoted system. And you can frame it in beautiful ways, with wood frames made for the screen so they have more than a presence. Then you can have a central server to hold and maintain the art. There are so many different ways to do it.

“I’m a huge believer in promoting the integration of new media work into collections, especially in homes that have traditional displays. You buy it because you love it, and the fact that it’s active shouldn’t matter. I think the devoted screen in your home is just one avenue that will become more and more common, especially with art collectors. ” – Bitforms Gallery’s Steven Sacks [2]

 

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_painting

[2] http://www.artspace.com/magazine/interviews_features/how_to_collect_new_media_art