Internet Art & New Media of China


Lily & Honglei, Chinese shadow puppetry, urbanization of China, Asian art, Chinese media art

Shadow Play, VR screenshot by Lily & Honglei Art Studio

After months of intensive work, Lily & Honglei Art Studio is launching a series of public presentations and exhibitions of their on-going project “Shadow Play” at three venues in April and May, 2016: Queens Museum of Arts (NY), Wilfrid Israel Museum for Asian Arts & Studies (Israel), and Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning (NY).

The exhibitions are produced in varied formats including video, augmented reality installation that is viewable on mobile phone apps, and prints juxtaposed with traditional Chinese shadow puppets (by courtesy of Wilfrid Israel Museum). The images appearing in the exhibitions present current stage of development of the multimedia project that integrates emerging technology such as Virtual Reality with traditional shadow puppetry motifs.

Lily & Honglei, Jamaica Flux, New York artist

Catalog of Jamaica Flux 2016

For more exhibition info and project updates, visit website http://lilyhonglei.com/shadowplay2

 

 

 

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http://www.dlux.org.au/cms/dTour/un-seen-sculptures.html

These virtual digital works are hidden from the naked eye but visible to anyone with an iPhone, Android or Nokia smartphone and an app called the Layar Reality Browser, that can be downloaded for free from iTunes, the Android Market or the Ovi Store.

For more about previous showings of (Un)seen Sculptures and to find out what’s been done in this field elsewhere in the world, follow some of the links in the AR Art Links box in the sidebar on this site. www.unseensculptures.com

If you want to create your own mobile augmented reality art, click on the DIY link at the top of this same site for some tips to get you started and some ideas about other directions to take your work.

Virtuale Switzerland

http://virtualeswitzerland.wordpress.com/

Virtuale stands for Virtual Biennale and is a Festival for public space using new digital tools not only to view the artworks and to interact with them, but also to design the experience of participation itself.

The program content for Virtuale focuses on the use of public space, mobile communication technologies, and explores the types of audiences found in public space,  inventing “playful” new strategies to bring the public into the exhibit as “real” visitors being offered a unique experience.

The project encompasses Artworks using Augmented Reality, Urban or Location Based Gaming, and Digital Heritage applications. It is interdisciplinary, bridging areas such as art and technology, digital heritage and tourism, as well as digital culture and art mediation.

http://virtualeswitzerland.wordpress.com/virtuale-2014/lausanne/artworks-lausanne/

The Butterfly Lovers – Derived from a popular Chinese folktale Butterfly Lovers, the painted figures in traditional costumes are placed at varied locations around the world. Utilizing Augmented Reality, the work addresses issues of Chinese diaspora and cultural identity, and visualizes the restless, roaming cultural spirit of the East hidden in western metropolis.

laussanne_butterflylovers_lillyhonglei

http://virtualeswitzerland.wordpress.com/virtuale-2014/basel/artworks-basel/

liliehonglei

http://virtualeswitzerland.wordpress.com/virtuale-2014/lugano/artworks-lugano/

The Crystal Coffin – The augmentation is inspired by the crystal coffin displayed in Mausoleum of Mao Zedong on Tiananmen Square since 1977, a year after Mao’s death. In the twenty first century, while China has been transforming itself into a modern society in many ways and gaining more influences economically and politically around the globe, Mao’s crystal coffin, the immortal-looking shell, remains exist as a symbol of authoritarian ruling system. During spring 2011, a crackdown on dissent – including detaining many intellectuals and members of religious group – followed by distinct signs of revival of Maoist policies, has left people baffled about the future direction of China. We therefore use Crystal Coffin of Mao as main body of the virtual China Pavilion topped with a tower and roof with ancient Chinese looking, as regulated by Ministry of Construction of China: architectural ‘designs must reflect traditional Chinese building styles’.
lugano_crystal-coffen

 

Invited by Dr. Alberto Guevara, the editor-in-chief of inTension journal of York University, virtual reality project Land of Illusion by Lily & Honglei Art Studio (currently with three active members, Xiying Yang, Honglei Li and He Li) will be published in the next issue of this academic journal.

http://www.yorku.ca/intent/issue7/

Lily & Honglei, new media art, Chinese contemporary artist, new media artist from China, new york artist Lily & Honglei

screenshot of ‘Land of Illusion: Monkey King at Heavenly Banquet’ virtual reality art project, by Lily & Honglei Art Studio

Lily & Honglei Art Studio, new media artist from China, He Li, contemporary Chinese art, Chinese new media artist, new york new media artist, new york artist, Lily & Honglei

screenshot of ‘Land of Illusion: Carousel of Sichuan Earthquake,’ virtual reality art project by Lily & Honglei Art Studio

http://www.yorku.ca/intent/cfw.html

Issues of the journal are theme-based, but space is provided in each issue for articles, reviews, and artwork that engage the core interests of InTensions: the theatricality of power, corporealities of structural violence, and sensory regimes.

InTensions is now accepting proposals for guest edited issues. Please contact Alberto Guevara or Elysée Nouvet.

Issue 7 ‘Fun and Games – Playing to the Limit’

Guest Editors:
Dr. David Harris Smith, McMaster University
Dr. Elysée Nouvet, McMaster University

To play is human. Play is a social act of often unclear boundaries. The delineation of playing as a special conditional form of doing or acting in the world relies upon registers of seriousness, authenticity, consequence and import, yet these registers are ultimately ambiguous. Play can materialize and relativize banal affective and social relations. Play can imagine, insist on the possibility of, or suppress, difference. Play may provoke shock or distraction, conceal or reveal intention. Play may be encouraged or denied, rewarded or punished, feared, disdained, addictive, fatal.

What becomes possible as a result of play in specific contexts? What socio-cultural relations are inscribed in the various sites of play? Are there limits to the social power of play, or limits to the social contexts in which playful acts may be asserted? Or is the very delineation of some actions as play itself a limit on imagination and transformation? To what extent do the connotative associations of theatre, sport, or childhood constitute a limit on what is considered play? What is the role of play in science, industry, politics, or war? What associations are can be traced between play and inductive, exploratory, or experimental knowledge generation?

Developmental theories situate play in the process of accommodating to reality, whereby the child first assimilates difficult and incongruous aspects of reality by revisiting them with familiar schema. For Baudrillard, the reproduction of the ‘real’ risks eclipsing its truth-value. These positions inscribe a vast territory populated by varying admixtures of representation and awe. Is play necessarily reactionary if it is absorbed into the normative and normalizing practices of (re)production and consumption (Debord)? When are play and playfulness critical distractions to organized protest? Alternatively, how might simulation and virtual worlds unleash important re-imaginings and re-mappings of the social (Deleuze)?  What are the unique potentialities of play when engaged as formative, preliminary, inconsequential, non-serious, speculative, or exploratory?

In this issue, we invite scholarly/artistic contributions that engage the relations between play, power, and social reproduction. We welcome theoretical explorations, as well as reflections, experiments, reports, or ethnographies on play and playfulness in its lived, historical, and cultural contexts.

View past issues of InTensions:

http://www.yorku.ca/intent/pastissues.html

Lily & Honglei new media artist, new media art China, venice biennale, manifest.ar, Lily & Honglei Chinese contemporary artists

Lily & Honglei: Crystal Coffin-Virtual China Pavilion at the 54th Venice Biennial

SPATIAL NARRATIVES IN ART

by SIMONA LODI, Art Director Share Festival , Curator, Art Critic

simona.lodi@toshare.it

Abstract

The text analyzes the work of artists who use augmentation, information and immersion in specifc contexts—public orprivate spaces. Te aim of the analysis is to understand socio-cultural transformations in the felds of art and technologyin social space and what new forms of aggregation and participation have developed, providing an opportunity to refecton new concepts of democracy that are emerging in our global media age. Te question underlying the study is how doartists who use augmentation, information and immersion give new meaning to the concept of public space, changingthe proprietary boundaries of that space and concept of what it is to perceive reality.

Manifest.AR members John Craig Freeman and Sander Veenhof, with Simona Lodi from the Invisible Pavilion, at Venice Biennial 2011 Opening

Manifest.AR members John Craig Freeman and Sander Veenhof, with Simona Lodi from the Invisible Pavilion, at Venice Biennial 2011 Opening

Working on the Invisible Pavilion project for the 54th Venice Biennale, it so happened that we came across another group of artists working on much the same issue, so we decided to cooperate with them and launch ajoint attack on the Biennale from diferent fronts and perspectives. In June 2011, the cutting-edgeinternational cyberartist group Manifest.AR¹¹ issued a statement to the general public and to the presidentand director of the 54th Venice Biennale informing them that they had created additional pavilions in theGiardini concourse, built in the new medium of augmented reality, and that some of the works had leakedout into the public space of Saint Mark’s Square. Te artists Mark Skwarek, Sander Veenhof, Tamiko Tiel,Will Peppenheimer, John Craig Freeman, Lily and Hong Lei, Naoko Tosa and John Cleater all took partdirectly in the project.

Tamiko Thiel, with Simona Lodi and Gionatan Quintini from the Invisible Pavilion

Tamiko Thiel, with Simona Lodi and Gionatan Quintini from the Invisible Pavilion

As Tamiko Tiel explains:

“Augmented reality has redefned the meaning of ‘public space.’ As corporations privatize many public spaces and governments put the rest under surveillance, augmented reality artists take over the invisible but actual realm that overlays real space with multiple parallel universes. Augmented reality actualizes the metaverse in the real universe, merging the digital and the real into a single, common space. Augmented reality can conquer space but it is not indifferent to space. With my artworks you must negotiate real space in order to view the works. They are usually not single images or objects, but installations that surround you. In order to look at them you must move your body in space, looking up, down and twisting around.12” In Shades of Absence: Outside Inside, Tamiko Tiel inserted into the closed curatorial space of the Giardini concourse in Venice the silhouetted fgures of artists who have been threatened with arrest or physical violence. Regardless of whether they are outsiders or insiders to the Art System, known internationally or only within small circles, their work has excluded these artists from the safety of protected space.

More info:

http://manifestarblog.wordpress.com/manifestar-opening-venice-biennial-2011/

Read the entire article here.

Commissioned by New Radio and Performing Arts Inc., new media art project Shadow Play: Tales of Urbanization of China is complete in May 2014 and soon to be launched via Turbulence.org.

Designed and produced by Lily & Honglei Art Studio, a New York-based collective with three artists, Xiying Yang, Honglei Li and He Li, ‘Urbanization of China’ is a multimedia project comprised several phases. Following the first phase ‘Shadow Play,’ more work will be unveiled over next 2-3 years period, with funding from varied channels.

net-art, turbulence.org, commission, Lily & Honglei Art Studio, new media art in China, Chinese new media artist, artist He Li, Chinese contemporary artist

Commissioned by New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.

Shadow Play: Tales of Urbanization of China

Over the past few decades, China has been undergoing urbanization at an astounding pace. In 2013, the newly inaugurated national leadership raised the process to a new gear when it unveiled its plan of converting 70 percent of the population to a city-oriented lifestyle by 2025. Such a significant change would undoubtedly transform the character of a country that has been largely agrarian throughout its millennia of history. One may wonder how, and to what extent, the landscape, culture, and daily being of the nation’s people may be altered. As artists, we are compelled to explore and reflect upon the various phases of this historic undertaking. Through fieldwork in China, we collect the ingredients necessary for a multimedia production that combines traditional artistic expressions with emerging technologies. The project make use of innovative means of expression such as virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) to visualize the metamorphosis that results from the urbanization process. With an outlook to the future through digital technologies, a retrospective into the past through time-honored imagery, and a reflection of the present through immersion in the realities of the modern China, we seek to present the unfolding of a monumental development to the conscience of a worldwide audience.  (2014 © Lily & Honglei Art Studio)

construction2

visualization of “Shadow Play: Tales of Urbanization of China”
© 2014 Lily & Honglei Art Studio

Shadow Play: Tales of Urbanization of China is a 2014 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., for its Turbulence.org website. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

Our new animation ‘Dragon’ has been invited to video art festivals around the world, including in Iran, Hungary and Russia.

Work Description

Production: L&H Art Studio
Animation Design: Bill He Li
Medium: Digital animation, Soundtrack
Duration: 4-minute
Year of Completion: 2012

Statement

The work is created during 2012, the Chinese Lunar Dragon Year. Associating imagery of human brain with Dragon, one of the most significant cultural creations of China, the work reflects on intriguing meaning of this symbol of Power. Dragon, the imaginary, almighty creature, is the subject of many Chinese classics specially focusing on its ability of adjusting itself for controlling. This cultural icon is vividly alive throughout Chinese history, inspiring personal and national ambitions in both ancient and contemporary societies of China. Within this context, the short film visualizes how this thousand-year-old unreal creature has influenced Chinese people’s mindset and thinking.

Screenings in Hungary and Russia:

Lily & Honglei once again collaborate with CologneOFF Video Chanel to present new animated short film Dragonat Art & Animation Festival, partnering with 3 art institutions in Europe:

–         the 8th. Budapest Short Film Festival, Hungary

–         XI Kansk International Video Art Festival, Russia

–        Anima Banja Luka (Bosnia – Herzegovina)

To learn more about Art & Animation Festival, go to http://caaf01.newmediafest.org/
________________________________________________
Screening in Iran:
dragon-lilyhonglei-iran
dragon-lilyhonglei-iran2
Private Negation

@ SAZMANAB
IN TEHRAN / IRAN

Experimental video animations
by 14 aritsts
Co-curated by
Morehshin Allahyari (Dallas & Denver, USA)
Alysse Stepanian (Los Angeles)
Sazmanab Location: Apt. 2, No. 99, Pardis St. Ariafar St. Sazman-e ab St. Sheikh Fazlollah HWY, Tehran, Iran
Wednesday, July 25, 2012
Screening: 7PM – 8PM Tehran’s time
Q&A with the curators via the internet: 8PM – 8:30PM

More information: http://manipulatedimage.com/MI18_sazmanab.html

Curated by Morehshin Allahyari and Alysse Stepania

Our perception of reality conforms to human-made logic while the construct of logic is defined by the limitations of our perceptions. The language of power is built upon the illusion of logic, designed to create cultural hegemony and maintain social hierarchies. The subversive video animations in this show challenge the language of logic and control in unexpected worlds of simulated realities. On one level, the nature of the GUI (graphic user interface) of video and animation software directly influences the creative process, as the program itself exerts a self-contained logic and control rooted in the code and interface design. On another level, the medium of video animation in these experimental works allows visualizations of unfamiliar realities that call for reinterpretations and active participation from the viewer.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS:

Christopher Coleman | Sachiko Hayashi | Shane Mecklenburger | Jonathan Monaghan | Morehshin Allahyari | Jon Satrom | Alysse Stepanian & Philip Mantione | Michael Lasater | Jenny Vogel | Claudia Hart | Lily & Honglei | Gerald Guthrie | Albert Merino | Julia Zastav

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